Break "the Rule": Why the Two-Week Notice is Not Your Friend in CS/SPD



So it's been a while since I've posted anything overtly controversial, but this article may reset that counter back to "0 Days without a Controversy".


Today, I want to talk about quitters. Unless your name is Arlene Scisney (a 30-year veteran instrument tech at Jewish Hospital SPD), chances are high that you have worked at more than one Sterile Processing department in your illustrious career. And if that's the case, and you were a technician, you probably followed the "two-week notice" rule with all professional diligence and due regard. You interviewed elsewhere, got an offer, accepted, and then waited until 14 days from your new start date to hand in your letter of resignation to the appropriate party. I mean, that's what you're supposed to do, right? Well, I'm going to spend the rest of this post to say, "NO!"


The Mythical Elephant in the Room: Last and Least

Although it is true that most HR departments and industry standards request a minimum of two-week notice for resignations, the key word in that is not "two weeks," it's "minimum."

If your goal is to grow in the Sterile Processing industry (and let's just assume it is for the purposes of this post), every decision you make at work becomes a part of your living-resume, also known as your professional reputation. And, although it is true that most HR departments and industry standards request a minimum of two-week notice for resignations, the key word in that is not "two weeks," it's "minimum." The very least that you can do as an SPD professional is to give your leader a 14-day heads up that you'll be leaving the reservation. But do you do that in the rest of your professional life? The absolute least? Do you want to be known as the guy/gal who does just enough to get by, but nothing more?